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Friedemann Goldberg LLP and our attorneys have been honored by numerous organizations and publications for their skill and dedication. We have been recognized as one of the "Best Places to Work in the Bay Area" for seven consecutive years by the North Bay Business Journal. Our firm boasts two Certified Specialists in Estate, Trust & Probate Law by the State Bar of California, three Lawyer of the Year awards by Best Lawyers Magazine, and more than thirty individual Super Lawyers awards.




News from the Firm

Paskenta Tribe ordered to pay attorneys’ fees of $1,049,559.16 to Cornerstone Community Bank

The Paskenta Band of Nomlaki Indians sued Cornerstone Community Bank, and its CEO Jeffrey Finck, among others, in connection with the alleged embezzlement of millions of dollars by executives of the Tribe. The Tribe sued the Cornerstone defendants for negligence, breach of contract, and aiding and abetting the alleged embezzlements, even though the alleged embezzlers were authorized signers on the Tribe’s bank accounts at Cornerstone.

After the Court granted summary judgment in January dismissing all claims against Cornerstone, Cornerstone filed a motion to recover its attorneys’ fees...

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Attorney Blog

Looking For a Cannabiz Safe Harbor

By: Casey Edmondson

Cannabis businesspeople have hoped, worked, and lobbied for a “safe harbor” for their industry. These tireless efforts have produced results, but the “safe harbor” which currently exists is, to extend the metaphor, filled with shallow water, difficult to enter, and has plenty of reefs.

Federal law is the supreme law of the land, and where it conflicts with state law, federal law controls. But if Congress refuses to budget money to the executive branch so that it can enforce a law, that law exists in a twilight state—it is unenforceable as a practical matter, but still “supreme.”